ICYMI: Cannabis Cash and Credit Cards Still a Pain in the Bud

Cannabis credit cards

Because of federal prohibition, marijuana businesses have limited access to financial services. Distributing cannabis is a federal crime and proceeds from cannabis sales trigger anti-money laundering laws. The Bank Secrecy Act requires banks combat fraud and money laundering and protect against criminal activity. This Act mandates banks investigate their customers for criminal activity and it prohibits banks from doing business with bad actors. Additional banking laws also require national banks file Suspicious Activity Reports (SARs) with the federal government when they know or suspect an account holder is engaged in or trying to cover up illegal activity.

Yesterday, I participated on an educational panel entitled, “The Marijuana Industry & Financial Services: What’s Happening? What’s in Store?” at the American Bar Associations’ Business Law Section Meeting in New Orleans. This panel was co-sponsored by the ABA’s Credit Card Committee, highlighting how important the banking and financial services issues are to both the cannabis industry and to the financial services industry. Federal cannabis prohibition has been hugely costly to the cannabis industry and its customers and to the financial services industry as well, not to mention the massive public safety issues engendered by having to work in an all-cash business.

Federal banking laws kept most banks and credit unions from knowingly working with marijuana businesses until February 2014, when the Financial Crimes Enforcement Network (FinCEN) and the Department of Treasury issued guidelines for financial institutions that want to bank cannabis businesses. These guidelines require banks and credit unions vet their marijuana business customers and regularly report their marijuana customers’ activities to the federal government to ensure compliance with the 2013 Cole Memo.

Though the FinCEN guidelines address getting a bank account (and thoughseveral U.S. Senators have asked for increased guidance from FinCEN regarding banking marijuana ancillary businesses), there are no federal guidelines regarding credit card usage in the cannabis industry, and so none of the big credit card networks (Visa, MasterCard, American Express, Discover) allow their cards to be used for buying or selling of cannabis. This means that even if a marijuana retailer manages to open and maintain a bank account, it likely has no way to accept credit card payments and cannabis customers still typically pay in cash to purchase marijuana products. Even the FinCEN guidelines don’t completely alleviate the cash issue as a result.

These cash payment issues have forced marijuana retailers to employ alternative payment processing methods, such as cashless ATMs, third party payment programs, and bitcoin. These non-bank financial services address many of the problems that arise from running a cash-only business, but they also come with their own set of challenges. Just by way of one example, my law firm’s cannabis business lawyers have handled many cases where banks stopped paying third party payment processors, resulting in our clients (the cannabis businesses, themselves) not getting paid. No alternative payment service matches traditional credit cards on safety, costs or ease of use. Unless and until cannabis becomes federally legal, cannabis businesses and their customers will still need to employ credit card workarounds (for better or worse).

For more on cannabis and the banking industry, check out our following posts on this topic:

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