Uniform Marijuana Standards

Marijuana and cannabis safety standards ASTMASTM International recently announced plans to launch a new committee on creating technical standards and guidance materials for the full life cycle of cannabis products. The new ASTM cannabis committee initially plans to focus on developing voluntary consensus standards related to cannabis in the following six technical areas:

  • Indoor and outdoor horticulture and agriculture
  • quality management systems
  • laboratory
  • processing and handling
  • security and transportation
  • personnel training, assessment, and credentialing

The development of uniform standards for cannabis related products, systems and services is critical to the cannabis industry because there is no currently no consensus on how cannabis products should be produced and processed to ensure product quality and safety. Because cannabis and its derivatives are still illegal under federal law, federal agencies such as the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) have not enacted anything that resembles the regulations it has implemented for tobacco products or medications or food. Some states, such as Colorado and Washington, have some quality control and assurance rules, especially regarding the safety of edibles and the use of pesticides. However, many aspects of cannabis remain wholly unregulated at the state level, and the patchwork of state regulations introduced thus far by various states have been inconsistently drafted and implemented.

ASTM International is one of the world’s largest voluntary standards developing organizations and it has helped develop over 12,000 industry standards for materials and products ranging from aluminum to zippers. ASTM International draws input for proposed standards from volunteer members from around the world that represent a broad range of industry stakeholders such as producers, users, consumers, government and academia. ASTM standards are voluntary, but many government regulators cite to them in their laws, regulations and codes, thus giving them the force of law. They also are commonly referred to in court cases.

The process of drafting, reviewing, and approving ASTM standards for the cannabis industry will take time. Once a technical committee for cannabis is established, ASTM will establish subcommittees to address individual technical areas. Each subcommittee will establish a task group responsible for researching and drafting a proposed standard. The draft standard will then be reviewed and voted upon by the technical committee and then it will go to the full ASTM membership. Depending on the committee and subject matters, ASTM standards can be drafted, reviewed, and approved in as little as nine months, or can take more than a year.

This process of developing industry standards for cannabis presents an opportunity for a data-driven conversation on how the cannabis industry should evolve and mature. Identifying objective standards for best-practices in the processes of growing, producing, processing, transporting, and packaging cannabis products will be a necessary step if the cannabis industry is going to mature and sustain itself on a broader (and potentially international) scale. When railroads were first introduced in the United States, locomotives and railroad tracks used different gauges in different parts of the country because the railways initially were built only to serve local needs. The cannabis industry is in a similar early stage of development, with individual states drafting and implementing cannabis regulations that are inconsistent with others in other states. Ultimately, the development of industry standards is a necessary step that will help the cannabis industry grow beyond its current state limits and speed up the day when our country sees cannabis as just another legal product.

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