Washington State Cannabis Laws: Change is Coming

Washington State cannabis lawyers

The Washington State Legislature recently passed SB 5131, which contains many tweaks to Washington’s cannabis laws. The measure now awaits signature by Washington Governor Jay Inslee. Here are ten ways SB 5131 could change Washington’s marijuana market if Governor Inslee signs it into law:

  1. Homegrown Marijuana. SB 5131 would allow licensed marijuana producers to sell immature cannabis plants, clones, and seeds to qualifying patients who enter the state’s medical marijuana database. Patients who choose not to enter the database may grow up to four plants in their homes under current Washington law and it’s not clear how those patients would legally acquire immature plants, clones, or seeds in light of SB 5131. Additionally, the Washington State Liquor and Cannabis Board (“LCB”) must examine the viability of allowing recreational users to grow their own marijuana in a way that complies with the enforcement priorities outlined in the Cole Memo.
  2. Retail License Ownership. Under this bill, a retailer or individual “with a financial or other ownership interest in” a retail license can own up to five retail licenses. Current Washington State law limits an individual from having an ownership interest in more than three licensed retailers.
  3. Forfeiting applications. The bill would require the LCB forfeit retail licenses that have been issued but are not operational and open to the public after two years unless the delay in opening and getting operational is due to circumstances beyond the licensee’s control. However, the LCB may not require forfeiture if the licensee has been unable to open because of a town or county’s moratorium prohibiting a retail cannabis store or because zoning, licensing or other regulatory measures prevent the retail store from opening.
  4. Processing Hemp. The LCB must study the viability of allowing licensed processors to process industrial hemp grown in Washington. This could eventually lead to legislation that would allow processors to purchase cannabis plant material from farmers licensed to grow industrial hemp. Currently, processors may only purchase products from licensed cannabis producers or other processors.
  5. Advertising. SB 5131 would make the following substantial changes to cannabis advertising laws in Washington.
    1. Advertising to Kids. The bill would prohibit marijuana licensees from taking “any action directly or indirectly to target youth in the advertising, promotion, or marketing of marijuana and marijuana products, or take any action the primary purpose of which is to initiate, maintain, or increase the incidence of youth use of marijuana or marijuana products.” This includes prohibiting using toys, movie or cartoon characters, or other images that would cause youth to be interested in marijuana. It also prohibits using a “commercial mascot” which is defined as “a live human being, animal, or mechanical device used for attracting the attention of motorists and passersby so as to make them aware of marijuana products or the presence of a marijuana business.” This includes inflatable tube displays, persons in costumes, and sign spinners. Cities and counties would be free to further restrict marijuana advertising.
    2. Outdoor Advertising. Billboards visible from any street, road, highway, right-of-way, or public parking area cannot be used to advertise cannabis, except that a marijuana retailer may use a billboard solely to identify the name or nature of its business and directions to its retail store. Outdoor signs could not contain depictions of marijuana plants, products, or images that appeal to children. Outdoor advertising would be prohibited in “arenas, stadiums, shopping malls, fairs that receive state allocations, farmers markets, and video game arcades.” A limited exception would allow outdoor advertising at events where only adults are permitted.
  6. Gifting Marijuana. Adults twenty-one and over would be allowed to deliver marijuana to other adults so long as the marijuana is offered as a gift without financial remuneration and so long as the amount of marijuana gifted is no more than the amount an adult can legally possess in Washington — one ounce of useable marijuana flower.
  7. Licensing. This bill would allow a licensed marijuana business to enter into licensing agreements or consulting contracts “with any individual, partnership, employee cooperative, association, nonprofit corporation, or corporation” for goods or services, trademarks, and trade secrets or proprietary information. Licensees would be required to disclose these agreements to the LCB.
  8. Public Disclosure. SB 5131 would exempt trade secrets and other proprietary information of a licensed marijuana business from disclosure under Washington’s Public Disclosure Act.
  9. “Organic” Weed. The bill instructs the LCB to adopt regulations for marijuana similar to products certified as organic under federal regulations. The organic standard is granted pursuant to federal regulations and because marijuana is illegal under federal law, it cannot qualify under those federal standards. The LCB would adopt regulations so that marijuana could be grown in a way that mimics organic products. The products then could be labeled as compliant with the state’s standards.
  10. Tribal Oversight. SB 5131 would require the LCB receive approval from a federally recognized Indian Tribe before granting a license on tribal land.

Governor Inslee is likely to sign SB 5131 into law, though he may veto certain parts of the bill. Stakeholders in Washington’s cannabis market should keep an eye on this legislation and prepare to make changes necessary to comply with SB 5131 if and when it gets signed.

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